Tips

Wine in Israel

There are more than 200 wineries in Israel – some tiny, some small, some medium, some massive – producing excellent red and white vintages and sparkling wines.

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Kosher

“Kosher” is an adjective (“kashrut” is the noun) used to describe food that is “fit” or “clean” or, in other words, prepared and served according to Judaism’s 3,000-year-old dietary laws.

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Breakfasts, Cafés and snacking

In Israel’s early days, pioneers on kibbutzim would rise at 4AM to work the fields and milk the cows, and return for a hearty breakfast at 8 or 9AM. Breakfast would revolve largely around their own produce: eggs, bread, dairy products, fresh vegetables and fruit.

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Restaurants

Almost every restaurant in Israel has menus in English. Occasionally, the spellings or translations can be a bit strange, but these can provide amusement as well as charm.

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Are all the restaurants in Israel kosher?

Not all of the restaurants in Israel are kosher. Places offering kosher food usually display a kashrut certificate granted to them by the local rabbinate.

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Is everything closed on Shabbat in Israel?

Shabbat (the Sabbath) is the Jewish holy day of the week observed every Saturday. Shabbat starts at sunset on Friday and ends at sundown on Saturday evening.

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Can you drink tap water in Israel?

Absolutely: tap water in Israel is safe and delicious.

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Do I need to receive any special vaccination before my trip to Israel?

Not at all. Israel is an entirely western country with an advanced level of hygiene, health care, diagnosis and medicine that is the envy of much of the world and on a par with the best of North America and Western Europe.

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Is it safe to travel to Israel?

Israel is an extremely safe country to visit and tour. In 2012, close to four million tourists came to Israel, an all-time record, and all of them went back home again safe and sound. We would not encourage tourists to come if we felt they would be in the slightest danger.

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Do I need a visa to travel to Israel?

Americans, Canadians and citizens of most western countries* need just a passport to come to Israel: no visa is required. Your passport must be valid for at least six months from the date you enter the country.

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Transportation in Israel

Israel is a small country, and it is therefore easy to get from one place to another in a relatively short time. Public transportation is convenient, and you can get to almost any destination for a reasonable price.

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What to Pack

What To Pack What To Pack Israel is a modern, developed country, and you can purchase virtually anything you need during your stay, including clothing, cosmetics, and hygiene products.

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Electrical Appliances

The Israeli power supply is single phase 220 volts at 50 Hertz.

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Emergency Services

Emergency Phone Numbers & Magen David Adom

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Purchases and Payments

All goods and services may be purchased with the following currencies, which can be freely exchanged

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Changing Money

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Israeli Currency

The State of Israel’s currency is the New Israel Shekel (NIS) or shekel for short (pluralized as shkalim in Hebrew or shekels in English).

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Weather in Israel

Israel enjoys long, warm, dry summers (April-October) and generally mild winters (November-March) with somewhat drier, cooler weather in hilly regions, such as Jerusalem and Safed.

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TIPPING

There are no hard-and-fast rules for tipping in Israel. Taxi drivers do not expect tips, but a gratuity for good service is in order.

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